White Rabbit

  • Year created: 1865
  • Disney premier: 1951
  • Favorite activity: Dating
  • Similar to: Alice

Disney White Rabbit Alice Cartoon BasicsDisney White Rabbit Alice cartoon

The White Rabbit is a fictional character in Lewis Carroll’s book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. He appears at the very beginning of the book, in chapter one, wearing a waistcoat, and muttering “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” Alice follows him down the rabbit hole into Wonderland. Alice encounters him again when he mistakes her for his housemaid Mary Ann and she becomes trapped in his house after growing too large. The Disney White Rabbit Alice cartoon shows up again in the last few chapters, as a herald-like servant of the King and Queen of Hearts.

How Did This Guy Get a Date?

In his article “Alice on the Stage,” Carroll wrote “And the White Rabbit, what of him? Was he framed on the “Alice” lines, or meant as a contrast? As a contrast, distinctly. For her ‘youth,’ ‘audacity,’ ‘vigour,’ and ‘swift directness of purpose,’ read ‘elderly,’ ‘timid,’ ‘feeble,’ and ‘nervously shilly-shallying,’ and you will get something of what I meant him to be. I think the White Rabbit should wear spectacles. I’m sure his voice should quaver, and his knees quiver, and his whole air suggest a total inability to say ‘Boo’ to a goose!” Overall, the White Rabbit seems to shift back and forth between pompous behavior toward his underlings, such as his servants, and grovelling, obsequious behavior toward his superiors, such as the Duchess and King and Queen of Hearts, in direct contrast to Alice, who is reasonably polite to everyone she meets.

Personality Ticks

In Disney’s animated version of the book, the Disney White Rabbit Alice cartoon seems to have the most logic out of all the Wonderland characters. Thus, he is often the straight man for their zany antics; when he asks the Dodo for help on getting the “monster” (Alice) out of his house, Dodo’s ultimate solution is to burn the house down, to which the the Disney White Rabbit Alice cartoon is greatly opposed. At the Mad Tea Party, the Mad Hatter and the March Hare try to “fix” the Disney White Rabbit Alice cartoon’s watch, proclaiming it “exactly two days slow”. Through various food they put in the watch (butter, tea, jam, and lemon), the two cause it to go mad, and the Hare smashes it with his mallet. The the Disney White Rabbit Alice cartoon was perhaps most famous for the little ditty he sang at the beginning – “I’m late! I’m late! For a very important date! No time to say hello, goodbye! I’m late! I’m late! I’m late!” The the Disney White Rabbit Alice cartoon was voiced by Bill Thompson. Some believe the the Disney White Rabbit Alice cartoon was late for the announcement of the Queen to the royal garden. The panic the rabbit showed was his fear of losing his head. Upon her arrival (where Alice has been helping to paint the roses red) the cards finish their song and the rabbit blows his trumpet (which he had been carrying for most of his lines) royally introducing the king and queen.

 

Some of this article uses modified material from the Wikipedia article on the Disney White Rabbit Alice cartoon “White_Rabbit“, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.